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5 essays to read on Boston, our home

A view of the Boston skyline on July 21, 2021 when haze from the wildfires out West covered the city. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)
A view of the Boston skyline on July 21, 2021 when haze from the wildfires out West covered the city. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Residents of Boston know the love they have for the city is deep, and is also paired with an urgency to constantly try to make it better.

Over the years, Cognoscenti's writers have expressed their love for their neighborhood, their journeys to finding a home here, and their yearning for more from this city on a hill.

Here's a taste:


After 48 years, it’s official: Boston you’re my home

The author Anita Diamant moved to Boston in 1975, just after college. She fell in love with the architecture, the history, and all the bookstores, but the Charles River is what clinched it: "a ribbon of light in the middle of everything."

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You can say 'Hello' on the street, Boston. We'd all be better for it

I am trying to unlearn all the icy tendencies I’ve developed over years in New England, writes Laura Everett. The only way I know to “love thy neighbor” is to start by acknowledging that you neighbor exists.

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My Mattapan, my home

I love my neighborhood, writes Arielle Gray, but there’s a historic relationship between Mattapan and violence that is leaving its inhabitants feeling battered and weary.

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Why I’m breaking up with you, Boston

You're too expensive, you lack social skills and you're really segregated, writes Anya Weber. I’m ready for a change. What about you?

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I fear I'm becoming a Masshole

I’m a rule-follower. I’ve never even gotten a parking ticket, writes Kate Fussner. I can’t become that arrogant, aggressive, angry driver who gives the rest of us a bad name.

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Why I'm staying with you, Boston

The T is aggravating, affordable housing is an oxymoron and racial segregation persists, writes Miles Howard. But I have utterly failed to encourage you to evolve. No longer.

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